Presentations

2021

About Individualized Funding – Fall 2021

Power Point Presentation by the Individualized Funding Coalition for Ontario

What is Individualized Funding? Check out this Power Point presentation for a better understanding. See the concept of individualized funding defined through the lens of the ‘Coalition’, and see the criteria used in to be part of international research. There is a great deal of common ground. Values, principles and how funding might be used is also shared in the presentaiton. Milestones and turning points with individualized funding and innovation over 4 decades are chronologically listed. Relevant links are provided.

Click here to download ‘About Individualized Funding-Fall 2021’.pdf

A Walk Through Some History – May 5, 2021

Power Point Presentation by the Individualized Funding Coalition for Ontario

This is Part One of two presentations made at the May 5, 2021, Ontario Independent Facilitation Network (OIFN) Reflective Practice Conversation. This presentation provides an overview of our historical work, and the evolutionary learning and understanding about the importance of planning and support mechanisms for people using individualized funding, and what is now commonly called independent facilitation. The presentation begins with some early milestones in Ontario. It continues with the establishment of the ‘coalition’, sharing about initial and later activities, and references the connection between individualized funding and planning and facilitation with people and families living with disabilities over the years.

Click here to download ‘A Walk Through Some History’.

What 24 Years of Experience from Around the World is Telling Us

Power Point Presentation by the Individualized Funding Coalition for Ontario

This is Part Two of two presentations made at the May 5, 2021, Ontario Independent Facilitation Network (OIFN) Reflective Practice Conversation. This presentation provides highlights from international research — a systematic review — that was done on individualized funding interventions/studies from around the world that met certain criteria and occurred between the years 1992 and 2016. We believe that the information from the ‘review’ offers affirmation for 2 decades of work done by the Individualized Funding Coalition for Ontario and what we believe.

Note: The review published in 2019 is called: “Individualized funding interventions to improve health and social care outcomes for people with a disability: A mixed‐methods systematic review”. Researchers were: Pádraic Fleming, Sinead McGilloway, Marian Hernon, Mairead Furlong, Siobhain O’Doherty, Fiona Keogh and Tim Stainton.

Click here to download ‘What 24 Years of Experience. . .’


2013

Impact of a Full-time Independent Facilitator

Infographic – Presentation to the Ministry of Community and Social Services by the Individualized Funding Coalition for Ontario, September 2013

The graphic on page one of this document visually demonstrates the impact that happens when a full-time independent facilitator works with people, their families and networks over a period of time.  Facilitators have impact with the person, those who are in their lives, and those they connect with in their neighbourhoods and communities. This would include community development work that is done to support and connect people in valued roles. The visual diagram illustrates the building of: capacity, connections, relationships and involvement in community.

Click here for the ‘Impact of a Full-time Independent Facilitator Infographic – IFCO’.


2012

Walking Out, Walking On

Power Point Presentation by John O’Brien
Individualized Funding Coalition for Ontario event held January 23, 2012

John O’Brian shared stories, listened and inspired participants to think about walking out of beliefs and challenges that would hold them back: to know when to stay and possibly make a difference, and when to move on and create something new. We learned it may be time to walk out and walk on when the chances of good things coming from our efforts in any system start to decline. There are times when our active engagement has a good chance of making a difference; and there are times when we may hit the limit of our ability to influence. We may choose to maintain contact when there is still a small possibility of systems change, but also be careful about not investing too much energy and hope.  We are reminded to keep in mind: What is the source of the vision and practical knowledge necessary to encourage and guide action that supports good lives for people.

Click here to download ‘Walking Out, Walking On.’

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